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Matt
01-18-2015, 09:09 PM
Here is a tutorial series I am doing on how to mix in Reason. The virtual SSL mixer is so awesome and very power and very easy to use. If you have any questions please feel free to ask.



http://youtu.be/kMYbTcUILvM

You can watch the rest of the series on our Youtube channel here (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMYbTcUILvM&list=PLAB78vtCXAbwlyCYYP33XOMmdtwm-mhKU)

Adm (USA)
06-16-2015, 11:30 AM
I've watched all of them :)

Adm (USA)
06-16-2015, 11:31 AM
I forget alot so i go back to them often

divine1
07-22-2015, 02:46 AM
I am enjoying the videos...Watched the parallel track video today..talk about awesome..you can really tell the difference..I'm sure I will enjoy even more once I get some studio headphones. Thanks for being such a great resource.

Voyager
04-13-2016, 03:34 PM
This series of tutorials was fantastic and very helpful. The gain structure and the high and low parallel compression of the kick was great.

Still i'm wondering in the Part 3 were you're leveling why you did use the compressor as limiter for reducing the peaks of the Bass Synth and not the gain or the compressor as leveler. Because as i saw in one of your other video you explained that the compressor as limiter is more used to cut the peaks and bring the low volume and squash them to get them more tigh and dynamic like for the drums or vocals. So there is any specific reason why you choose the compressor as limiter ?

Also i didn't get the purpose of use the control room as volume. Initialy i thought you prefer to use the control room knob as volume to not touch your master fader because it had preferably to stay at 0dB. But i notice that as some points in your video you still use (if i remember correctly) your master fader and also you master fader isn't in it's initial position (0dB).
Because you also suggested that in peak/peak mode is prefered to stay around -4dB to keep a certain headroom for the mastering part. So around -4dB with the master fader at his initial 0dB position or in fact it doesn't have any importance where it is until you get around -4dB ?

Talking of vu-meter i notice you keept them in peak/peak mode, isn't the vu/peak mode more helpful ? Any preference about this ?

Finally about the gain structure, if we run out of gain reserve for the volume, i think you suggest that then is better to use a limiter device to get a bit some more dB than anything else. And i think i saw this suggestion in another youtuber video as well were he explain that using a limiter helps to preserve and not deteriorate any effect or compression we have on the particular track. So do this indeed apply and is the limiter option the best if we run out of gain ?


Thanks in advance for clarifying me out those points :)

Matt
05-24-2016, 12:49 AM
This series of tutorials was fantastic and very helpful. The gain structure and the high and low parallel compression of the kick was great.

Still i'm wondering in the Part 3 were you're leveling why you did use the compressor as limiter for reducing the peaks of the Bass Synth and not the gain or the compressor as leveler. Because as i saw in one of your other video you explained that the compressor as limiter is more used to cut the peaks and bring the low volume and squash them to get them more tigh and dynamic like for the drums or vocals. So there is any specific reason why you choose the compressor as limiter ?

When getting my static mix I never use the input faders and the reason is to try my best to control the levels of everything which is the very purpose of mixing. Each channel has two things that give me powerful control over the input and that is the Gain and Dynamic sections of the mixer and I use them to better control the level of the channel before it gets to the input fader. It's a proven fundamental process that works simple as that.


Also i didn't get the purpose of use the control room as volume. Initialy i thought you prefer to use the control room knob as volume to not touch your master fader because it had preferably to stay at 0dB. But i notice that as some points in your video you still use (if i remember correctly) your master fader and also you master fader isn't in it's initial position (0dB).
Because you also suggested that in peak/peak mode is prefered to stay around -4dB to keep a certain headroom for the mastering part. So around -4dB with the master fader at his initial 0dB position or in fact it doesn't have any importance where it is until you get around -4dB ?

I like to setup out my static mix, then the main output and then use the Control Room level but as you go through the mix you will have to adjust the main output. The purpose of the Control Room is to help keep a more consisted monitoring level as you mix.


Talking of vu-meter i notice you keept them in peak/peak mode, isn't the vu/peak mode more helpful ? Any preference about this ?

I prefer the Peak setting as it is easier ,for me, to see the peaks...simple as that.


Finally about the gain structure, if we run out of gain reserve for the volume, i think you suggest that then is better to use a limiter device to get a bit some more dB than anything else. And i think i saw this suggestion in another youtuber video as well were he explain that using a limiter helps to preserve and not deteriorate any effect or compression we have on the particular track. So do this indeed apply and is the limiter option the best if we run out of gain ?

If you run out of gain there are many ways to fix this, it all really depends on the track, the song, the circumstances. You just need to understand/hear how the process will after your mix. Don't read to much into this and rather concentrate on getting good recording levels from the start, now that is very important ;)

Sorry it took me so long to respond.



Thanks in advance for clarifying me out those points :)

Jack Zango
03-28-2017, 01:01 AM
Hi Matt and thanks for the tutorials, they're great! I have a question...I'm fairly new to Reason but not to recording. My question is this: should I bounce all my tracks to stereo when bouncing like with analog tape in the old days? No one ever mentions that in the DAW realms. I'm an old dog by the way and just recently got in to digital recording.
Thanks for any help!